Ammonium Chloride enteric-coated tablets

What are ammonium chloride enteric-coated tablets?

AMMONIUM CHLORIDE (Ammonium Chloride Enseals®) is an acid-forming salt that can help correct situations in which the blood contains too little chloride or is too alkaline (basic). This can occur following vomiting, suctioning (removal) of stomach contents, use of diuretics (water or fluid pills), or with certain stomach disorders. Ammonium chloride also causes mild diuresis (removal of excess salts and water through increased urination) and makes the urine more acidic. Ammonium chloride also has been used to reduce the swelling, bloating, or weight gain that occurs before menstrual periods; and as an aid to treating urinary tract infections. Generic ammonium chloride tablets are available.

What should my health care professional know before I take ammonium chloride?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • fluid on the lungs

  • high levels of chloride in the blood

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • metabolic acidosis

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to ammonium chloride, other medicines , foods, dyes, or preservatives

How should I take this medicine?

Take ammonium chloride tablets by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Swallow the tablets whole with a drink of water; do not crush or chew. Do not take ammonium chloride with antacids or milk. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What drug(s) may interact with ammonium chloride?

  • acetazolamide

  • potassium salts

  • sodium salts

Tell your prescriber or health care professional about all other medicines you are taking, including non-prescription medicines, nutritional supplements, or herbal products. Also tell your prescriber or health care professional if you are a frequent user of drinks with caffeine or alcohol, if you smoke, or if you use illegal drugs. These may affect the way your medicine works. Check with your health care professional before stopping or starting any of your medicines.

What should I watch for while taking ammonium chloride?

If you are taking nonprescription dosage forms, do not take for more than one week without consulting your prescriber or health care professional. Ammonium chloride can cause serious side effects and is not recommended for long-term use.

What side effects may I notice from taking ammonium chloride?

Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • confusion

  • drowsiness

  • frequent passing of urine

  • headache

  • increased thirst

  • muscle stiffness or twitching

  • muscle weakness

  • rapid, irregular, or shallow breathing

  • slow heartbeat

  • sweating

  • unusual tiredness

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • loss of appetite

  • nausea, vomiting

  • stomach upset

Where can I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children in a container that small children cannot open.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

What is ammonium chloride injection?

AMMONIUM CHLORIDE is an acid-forming salt that can help correct situations in which the blood contains too little chloride or is too alkaline (basic). This can occur following vomiting, suctioning (removal) of stomach contents, use of diuretics (water or fluid pills), or with certain stomach disorders. Ammonium chloride also causes mild diuresis (removal of excess salts and water through increased urination) and makes the urine more acidic. Generic ammonium chloride injections are available.

What should my health care professional know before I receive ammonium chloride?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • fluid on the lungs

  • high levels of chloride in the blood

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • metabolic acidosis

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to ammonium chloride, other medicines , foods, dyes, or preservatives

How should I use this medicine?

Ammonium chloride is for slow infusion into a vein. It is given by a health-care professional in a hospital or clinic setting.

Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What if I miss a dose?

This does not apply.

What drug(s) may interact with ammonium chloride?

  • acetazolamide

  • potassium salts

  • sodium salts

Tell your prescriber or health care professional about all other medicines you are taking, including non-prescription medicines, nutritional supplements, or herbal products. Also tell your prescriber or health care professional if you are a frequent user of drinks with caffeine or alcohol, if you smoke, or if you use illegal drugs. These may affect the way your medicine works. Check with your health care professional before stopping or starting any of your medicines.

What should I watch for while taking ammonium chloride?

Your condition will be monitored while you receive ammonium chloride injection.

What side effects may I notice from receiving ammonium chloride?

Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • confusion

  • drowsiness

  • frequent passing of urine

  • headache

  • increased thirst

  • muscle stiffness or twitching

  • muscle weakness

  • pain, redness, burning, swelling, or irritation at the injection site

  • rapid, irregular, or shallow breathing

  • slow heartbeat

  • sweating

  • unusual tiredness

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • loss of appetite

  • nausea, vomiting

  • stomach upset

Where can I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature below 40 degrees C (104 degrees F); do not freeze. Crystals can form at low temperature. These should disappear if the injection is warmed to room temperature. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.